Ways To Get Involved

Volunteer With Us

A community of volunteers have been the driving force behind the Bruce Trail for over 60 years. Today, more than 1,400 volunteers donate their time and talents to the Bruce Trail Conservancy and its nine Bruce Trail Clubs. Without this remarkable year-round support, the Bruce Trail Conservancy and the Bruce Trail would not be what it is today. They strive to keep it going today, and they’re looking for you to join them as the next generation of volunteers. 

Why Become a Volunteer with the Bruce Trail Conservancy and its Bruce Trail Clubs?

Volunteering with the Bruce Trail Conservancy and its Bruce Trail Clubs is a way to give back to the community helping to conserve and care for the Niagara Escarpment – home of the Bruce Trail. You’ll help secure the Bruce Trail, share and learn skills, be a part of a team, and develop lasting friendships.

There’s roles for people outdoors and inside, for people who love manual labor and those who are excellent organizers. Whether you’ve had years of experience or you’re brand new to volunteering, we look forward to helping you have the experience of a lifetime on the Trail of a lifetime. 

Volunteer Spotlight

Alina Lin

Alina Lin

I enjoy being able to hike or work with like-minded people. I get to connect with people from different cultures and backgrounds, learn new skills and knowledge, and share my experiences. I moved to Canada in 2009 and more than half of my friend circle and some best friends were made through volunteering! I also feel a sense of accomplishment seeing my volunteering efforts make a difference.

Alina Lin

Volunteer Spotlight

Alina Lin

I enjoy being able to hike or work with like-minded people. I get to connect with people from different cultures and backgrounds, learn new skills and knowledge, and share my experiences. I moved to Canada in 2009 and more than half of my friend circle and some best friends were made through volunteering! I also feel a sense of accomplishment seeing my volunteering efforts make a difference.

Bruce Trail Clubs

The Bruce Trail Conservancy has nine Bruce trail Clubs, each corresponding to a section of the Bruce Trail. Each Club is entirely volunteer run. They are responsible for most of the day-to-day work keeping the Bruce Trail open. In addition to trail maintenance, club volunteers build and repair boardwalks and other structures, monitor and protect the Trail conservation corridor, monitor and manage rare plants and invasive species, develop management plans for their sections, and much, much more. 

Volunteer Roles and Descriptions

Bruce Trail Clubs

Each of our nine Bruce Trail Clubs offer an extensive program of organized hikes, throughout the year, for members and non-members. Trained volunteers are responsible for leading and organizing these hikes – sharing with others the wonders of the Bruce Trail and the Niagara Escarpment.

Landowner relation volunteers help the Bruce Trail Conservancy maintain healthy working relationships with landowners, both public and private, whose land the Bruce Trail crosses, and resolves concerns as they may arise. Learn more about our landowner relations program.

Volunteers maintain the Bruce Trail and its side trails keeping the footpath safe, navigable, and enjoyable. From painting blazes, to building structures, to monitoring trail conditions, volunteers are needed every step of the way. Volunteer positions include: 

  • Trail director: Responsible for the planning, maintenance and overall quality of the Bruce Trail in the Bruce Trail Club’s section, and for the overall organization and operation of the Club’s trail work.
  • Trail captain: Maintains the Bruce Trail and side trails in a designated section of the Bruce Trail.
  • Trail maintenance volunteer: Help with construction and repairs on the Bruce Trail.

Collect important biodiversity data as you hike! Our citizen scientists are helping to develop a map of flora along the Bruce Trail. Whether you are a trained botanist, mycologist or ornithologist, or just interested in learning more about the different species calling the Bruce Trail home, the Bruce Trail Conservancy can use your help. Using the free powerful online tool iNaturalist, you can collect much needed data while you are out hiking the Bruce Trail. Learn more about our iNaturalist Bruce Trail Conservancy Project

Volunteers are a vital component of our land stewardship program. Volunteer land stewards actively care for each of the properties that are owned or managed by the Bruce Trail Conservancy. As the Bruce Trail Conservancy acquires more land in our efforts to establish a conservation corridor containing the Bruce Trail, our land stewardship needs grow. Learn more about our land stewardship program. Land stewardship positions include:

  • Land steward director: Each Bruce Trail Club has one land steward director to coordinate the work of the land stewards in that Club.
  • Land steward: Are the caretakers of each Bruce Trail Conservancy protected natural areas who visit their assigned property at least twice a year, complete annual reports on the conditions of the property, provide input into the stewardship plans, and help to organize and carry out stewardship activities such as tree planting, garbage removal, and installing signs and fences.

Each Bruce Trail Club has their own board which oversees the activities of the Club. There are many possible volunteer roles on the Bruce Trail Club Boards, including:

  • Bruce Trail Club President 
    Responsible for the general overseeing of Bruce Trail Club operations, and for the direction, development and promotion of the overall objectives and goals of the Club
  • Bruce Trail Club Vice President
    Act in place of the club president when the president is unavailable and to be the president elect
  • Bruce Trail Club Secretary
    Record proceedings of all Bruce Trail Club board and club executive meetings
  • Bruce Trail Club Treasurer
    Responsible for the custody of the funds of the Bruce Trail Club and all financial matters affecting the Club
  • Bruce Trail Club Director – Member at Large
    Participate in the Bruce Trail Club board’s deliberations and decisions in matters of policy, finance and advocacy
  • Bruce Trail Club Archivist
    Keep safe all of the important records of the Bruce Trail Club
  • Bruce Trail Club Fundraising Director
    Help to promote and collect funds through events or other initiatives to support the Bruce Trail Conservancy at the club level
  • Bruce Trail Club Hike Director
    Provide direction to all Bruce Trail Club hike leaders and compile a list of all upcoming hikes for the Bruce Trail Club newsletter
  • Bruce Trail Club Land Steward Director 
    Implement and promote the land stewardship program at the Bruce Trail Club level
  • Bruce Trail Club Landowner Relations Director 
    Maintain a healthy working relationship with landowners and resolve issues as they arise
  • Bruce Trail Club Membership Director
    Retain and increase the Bruce Trail Conservancy membership at the Bruce Trail Club level
  • Bruce Trail Club Newsletter Editor
    The main administrative contact in producing the Bruce Trail Club newsletter
  • Bruce Trail Club Public Relations & Publicity Director 
    Publicize Bruce Trail Club’s activities, aims and objectives
  • Bruce Trail Club Trail Director
    Responsible for the planning, maintenance and overall quality of the Bruce Trail in the Bruce Trail Club’s section, and for the overall organization and operation of Trail work

Bruce Trail Club Volunteer Coordinator
Coordinate volunteers throughout the Bruce Trail Club, and to facilitate the recruiting, training and recognition of all volunteers in the Club

Bruce Trail Conservancy

The Bruce Trail Conservancy is governed by a board of directors and supported by the strategic and operational committees.
Learn more about our board of directors 

The Bruce Trail Conservancy relies on its dedicated office volunteers and our archivist. Both roles spend regular time in the office helping with many different tasks, including: 

  • BTC Office Volunteer

Help out in the office in a variety of capacities, stuffing envelopes, data entry, answering phones and serving customers in the store. 

  • BTC Archivist 

Maintain BTC items of historic importance.

Current Volunteer Opportunities

Volunteers are the heart and soul of the BruceTrail, and there are many opportunities for you to give back to the Trail you love so much. Thank you for your interest in giving back to the Bruce Trail Conservancy and the Bruce Trail through volunteering.

  • Head Office Volunteers: Support the BTC Fund Development team in its efforts including: making donor thank-you calls, assisting with seasonal mailings, and researching grant opportunities.
  • Document Manager and Archivist
  • Land Steward
  • Events and Fundraising Team
  • Trail Development and Maintenance
  • Hike Leaders
  • Vice President
  • Land Stewardship Assistant Director
  • Volunteer Coordinator
  • Director-at-Large
  • Landowner Relations Director
  • Land Acquisitions Committee Director

For interest in one of these roles, please contact the Niagara Bruce Trail Club directly by email at niagarabrucetrailclub@gmail.com or submit a volunteer application and note interest in a position.

  • Communications & Publicity Director
  • Hike Leader 
  • Trail Maintenance 
  • Trail Captain 
  • Trail Director
  • Volunteer Director
  • Vice President
  • Trail Director
  • Director-at-large

If you are interested in any of these positions

Volunteer Recognition

Volunteers are the soul of the Bruce Trail, and we appreciate all of their efforts! These extraordinary people put in thousands of hours of volunteer work every year to manage and promote the Bruce Trail in an effort to keep it open and in good repair.

The Calypso Orchid Environmental Award is awarded to an individual, volunteer group, institution or company that has demonstrated a significant contribution to the restoration and preservation of the Bruce Trail and/or the Niagara Escarpment Biosphere Reserve, or significantly enhanced the education of users or potential users of the Trail and/or the Niagara Escarpment Biosphere Reserve. The recipient needs not be a member of the Bruce Trail Conservancy. Exemplary actions by the recipients can have either a direct and/or indirect effect on the Bruce Trail. Meritorious actions can be a single event or undertaken over several years.

Background: In the spring of 1956 Arthur Storey saw his first calypso orchid on a trip to Tobermory. Twenty years later Lloyd Smith commemorated the event by carving a diamond willow walking staff for him, including a likeness of a calypso orchid on the handle. In 1997 Arthur donated the walking staff to the Bruce Trail Conservancy, with the wish that an environmental award be established. The Calypso Orchid Environmental Award was established in 2000.

The Calypso Orchid Environmental Award is awarded to an individual, volunteer group, institution or company that has demonstrated a significant contribution to the restoration and preservation of the Bruce Trail and/or the Niagara Escarpment Biosphere Reserve, or significantly enhanced the education of users or potential users of the Trail and/or the Niagara Escarpment Biosphere Reserve. The recipient needs not be a member of the Bruce Trail Conservancy. Exemplary actions by the recipients can have either a direct and/or indirect effect on the Bruce Trail. Meritorious actions can be a single event or undertaken over several years.

Background: In the spring of 1956 Arthur Storey saw his first calypso orchid on a trip to Tobermory. Twenty years later Lloyd Smith commemorated the event by carving a diamond willow walking staff for him, including a likeness of a calypso orchid on the handle. In 1997 Arthur donated the walking staff to the Bruce Trail Conservancy, with the wish that an environmental award be established. The Calypso Orchid Environmental Award was established in 2000.

Nomination Information: Request nomination form from the BTC Director of Organizational Resources here. . Send completed nomination to same email by June 1.

The Ross McLean Volunteer of the Year Award recognizes a volunteer who has shown extraordinary contributions to the Bruce Trail Conservancy within a single year (from April of the previous year to April of the current year only). The award is not intended to recognize a lifetime of contributions as that would preclude volunteers who have been with us for a short time. Any form of volunteering for the Bruce Trail Conservancy may be considered for this award.

This annual award was renamed in 2020 to honour the passing of its first recipient and remarkable volunteer, Ross McLean. 

Nomination Information: Submit nomination letter of 250 words outlining why the nominee should be considered for this award to the BTC Director Organizational Resources at jrandle@brucetrail.org by June 1.

This award is presented annually to an outstanding trail worker. Susan Oleskevich was a special Bruce Trail volunteer. For more than a decade she was a loyal trail maintenance volunteer. During this time, she was Trail Director for the Conservancy, and for the Caledon Hills and Toronto Bruce Trail Clubs.

When Susan died suddenly in the summer of 1995, a group of her friends wanted to donate a lasting symbol of her contribution to the Trail. From these discussions came the Susan Oleskevich Award. The contributions of Susan Oleskevich deserve to be remembered. With the annual presentation of this award, her memory will remain strong and provide a source of motivation for all of us as we continue our volunteer commitment.

The criteria for selection are that the winner shall:

  • Have been actively involved in the physical work of trail maintenance and development
  • Have long-standing commitment to trail work
  • Be an outstanding trail worker

Nomination Information: Submit a nomination letter to the Bruce Trail Conservancy Trail Director by August 15.

This annual award is given in recognition of the invaluable contributions made by our volunteers at the Bruce Trail Conservancy head office. Recipients are chosen annually by BTC staff and the award is presented at our year-end celebration.

The Bruce Trail Conservancy Honorary Membership is a prestigious award given to a member who has made a lasting, significant volunteer contribution to the organization at both the Bruce Trail Club and Bruce Trail Conservancy levels. The nominee must have demonstrated leadership, innovation, and commitment and have accomplished significant achievements in furthering the Bruce Trail Conservancy mission. The recipient is awarded a certificate and a complimentary lifetime membership.

Nomination Information: Request nomination form from the BTC Director of Organizational Resources here. Send completed nomination by June 1.

Awarded annually to the Bruce Trail Club completing the most significant trail project that places the Trail on the Optimum Route, or adds a worthwhile new side trail.

Awarded annually to the Bruce Trail Club completing the year’s most significant trail project which improves or protects the environment

The Bruce Trail Conservancy Years of Service Awards recognize volunteers who have contributed so many years to volunteering directly for the Conservancy, either through committees, boards, workgroups, or at the Head Office. Awards are given out for 1, 3, 5, 10,15, 20 and 25 years of service.

Years of service awards have been recorded since 1993. In 1993 a catch-up award was given to all volunteers, and volunteer time given since 1993 are all that is counted towards the years of service awards.

Annual Meeting Hiking Awards:

To nominate a volunteer, follow the button to complete the form. We appreciate all submissions, but we cannot guarantee that all volunteers will be profiled.

Volunteer Resources

Whether you’re experienced or new to volunteering with the Bruce Trail Conservancy or one of its Bruce Trail Clubs, we have resources to inspire and inform you about your role.

The Accessible Ontario Disability Act and the Bruce Trail Conservancy Volunteers

Does this apply to me?

The Accessibility Standard for Customer Service applies to all organizations (public, private and non-profit) that provide goods or services either directly to the public or to other organizations in Ontario and that have one or more employees in Ontario.

Training

The customer service standard requires training to staff and volunteers on providing customer service to people with disabilities. 

This includes hike leaders, board members, Head Office volunteers and staff.

An online course is available by following this link http://accessforward.ca/customerService/intro, or you can read this pdf document AODA Customer Service Training.  

Hike Leaders – Please note the following statement –  

This statement should be used, if necessary, to let people know what to expect when hiking the Bruce Trail:

While there are a few portions of the Bruce Trail within Conservation Areas that are wheelchair accessible, use of the majority of the Trail is suitable for foot traffic only. To participate in an organized hike, you need to be able to complete the specified length of the hike on your own or with your own support person within the time allowed. Please refer to the hiking schedule for hike details. 

This statement can also be added to your Club Newsletter hike listings.

Contact Jackie Randle for more information

Bruce Trail Conservancy Youth Council 

Join a network of conservation-minded youth and be the voice of the next generation for the Bruce Trail Conservancy!

We are seeking passionate individuals, ages 18-25, who are interested in trails and conservation, to join our first Bruce Trail Conservancy Youth Council and share their skills and voice in support of preserving a ribbon of wilderness.

Why Join the Bruce Trail Conservancy Youth Council?
  • Connect with other youth to discuss relevant environmental issues
  • Provide advice to the Bruce Trail Conservancy on ways to further engage youth in meaningful ways
  • Participate in online and in-person events centered around environmental education, hiking, and professional development
  • Learn about and help develop opportunities for youth volunteering along the Bruce Trail
  • Get relevant, timely volunteer experience in an environmental, non-profit setting
  • Support the Bruce Trail Conservancy’s mission to preserve a ribbon of wilderness, for everyone, forever
Two Ways to be Involved

Join as a general member at any point to be involved in monthly Zoom meetings, attend virtual and in-person events, and share your voice. If you are interested in taking on more of a leadership role, applications to join the Executive Committee will open again in Fall 2022.

All general member applicants will be invited to join monthly youth council virtual meetings. This is a flexible opportunity for those interested in getting involved.

General Members will:

  • Attend monthly Youth Council virtual meetings.
  • Provide their voice and opinion on important issues related to conservation and the environment with relation to the Bruce Trail Conservancy.
  • Participate in events and professional development opportunities.
  • Be invited to join the BTC Youth Council social media group to stay connected with other involved Youth Council members, and attend virtual and in-person events.

Executive Committee members will take a leadership role on the Youth Council, serving in their role from October 2021-May 2022.

Executive Committee Members will:

  • Determine the goals and objectives of the Youth Council
  • Plan and execute events
  • Help build the youth network of the Bruce Trail Conservancy

A chair and vice chair will be selected to lead the group, and a staff advisor from the Bruce Trail Conservancy will support the executive committee and youth council.

The role of an executive committee member will require a regular commitment of joining monthly virtual meetings, with additional calls as needed, assisting in planning of events, and being an active member by serving as a voice for youth in the Bruce Trail community.

Executive committee spots will be limited. If you are not selected to join the executive committee this year, you will be invited to join as a general member with lots of opportunities to still be involved. You only need to apply once. The executive committee will dissolve each May, with a new executive committee to be selected annually each fall.

Under 18? 

If you are under 18 years of age, please review our Minors Volunteering Policy with your parent or guardian.

For more information about the volunteer program

iNaturalist Bruce Trail Conservancy Volunteer Project

Collect important biodiversity data as you hike the Bruce Trail 

We’re looking for volunteer citizen scientists to help us better understand the biodiversity along the Bruce Trail. Whether you are a trained botanist, mycologist or ornithologist, or just interested in learning more about the different species calling the Bruce Trail home, the Bruce Trail Conservancy can use your help.  Using the free powerful online tool iNaturalist, you can collect much needed data while you are out hiking the Bruce Trail.  

Corporate Volunteering

The Corporate Volunteering Program will be relaunching in 2022.

Is your company looking for a unique volunteer opportunity? Look no further than the Bruce Trail.

Corporate volunteering provides an opportunity to support your local community, do some team building, and boost morale amongst your staff. Come join us for some fresh air, hiking and some hard work giving back to the Bruce Trail Conservancy! 

Sign up to be notified when we are ready to start booking by completing the form here.

A typical corporate volunteering event includes:

  • A staff guide from the Bruce Trail Conservancy to lead the day and the activity
  • An interpretive hike along the local section of Bruce Trail
  • An opportunity to give back through a rehabilitation activity that may include a trail clean-up, invasive species removal, planting, or another activity as per the needs of the land

For more information or to get started planning your corporate event with the Bruce Trail Conservancy, please get in touch.

Badges

Celebrate your achievements with these fun badges!

Bruce Trail Club Badges

Each Bruce Trail Club offers badges for completing its section of the Trail and for other challenges. Visit the Club websites for the latest offerings:

To obtain a Bruce Trail Club’s End-to-End badge, submit your trail logs for that Club’s section directly to the Club. Contact details are included in the links above.

End-to-end badge

End-to-End Badges

Keep a hiking log and by the end of your journey, let us know so that we may officially recognize you as an End-to-Ender and present you with your badge!

We’ve issued over 4000 official End-to-End numbers in our 50+ year history. That is a wonderful record and we know that there are many more who have completed the Trail without letting us know.

Each year the names of those who have reported End-to-End completions in the previous 12 months are published in the spring issue of Bruce Trail Conservancy Magazine.

To be recognized as an official End-to-Ender with the Bruce Trail Conservancy, we ask you to:
  1. Send us your hiking logs*
  2. Provide us with the date you completed your End-to-End
  3. Be a BTC member at the time you complete your End-to-End
  4. Send us $15 to cover the costs of your badge, certificate, and processing your End-to-End.

*The hiking logs can be as simple as a list of the dates of your hikes and where you started and ended each day. It might be worth having a separate page for each club section (especially as these will help you request Club Badges from the individual Bruce Trail Clubs).

Payment and logs can be sent to our mailing address at P.O. Box 857, Hamilton, ON L8N 3N9

Or

The colourful version of the Bruce Trail End-to-End Badge is available for $5.00 those who have already received their official End-to-End number and badge above. Sometimes it’s nice to have options!

Please note:

We operate on the honour system.
We give equal recognition to all End-to-End hikers regardless of sequence, direction, speed, or whether the End-to-End was completed as a thru-hike or in sections. The BTC does not maintain records of End-to-End completion time or of End-to-Enders gender, age or other characteristics.
We issue and End-to-End badge, a certificate, and a unique official End-to-End number
.

Badges Just For Kids!

Some of our Bruce Trail Clubs have designed special badges just for junior hikers. Visit the links below for more details on how your your nature enthusiast can earn them:

Young Trail Blazers and Young Nature Blazers Badges (from the Niagara Bruce Trail Club)

Junior Hiker Badges – one for each season (from the Iroquoia Bruce Trail Club)

Youth Badge (from the Toronto Bruce Trail Club)

Nature Hunter Badge (from the Caledon Hills Club)

Young Hiker Badge and Explorer’s and Adventurer’s Badges (from the Dufferin Hi-Land Club)

Bruce Trail Junior Birder (from the Peninsula Bruce Trail Club)

Other badges

Hike-a-thon Badge – given to particpants of the annual Hike-a-thon (since 2017)

Membership Badge – given to all new members

Volunteering Badge – given to all new volunteers

International Friendship Trail Badge Series

As a founding member of the World Trails Network, the Bruce Trail Conservancy is working with international trail organizations to raise awareness of and support for public footpaths through the creation of Friendship Trails. The Bruce Trail Conservancy currently has 9 Friendship Trails. In each case, a route on the Bruce Trail (main and side trails) and a corresponding route on the international trail have been designated as a Friendship Trail, displaying special signs to mark the partnership.

Earn your badge by hiking the Friendship Trail route on the Bruce Trail and on the corresponding twinned portion on the international trail.
From there you will be sent the main Friendship Trail badge and corresponding trail badge, at no cost.
Friendship trails map
Rim Of Africa Logo

The Rim of Africa Trail Friendship Trail – Niagara Club

A section of the Bruce Trail in the Niagara Club is twinned with a section of the Rim of Africa Trail. Below is a map of the Rim of Africa Friendship Trail on the Bruce Trail. You’ll also find it on our Bruce Trail Reference Map 3.

The Rim of Africa is a unique mountain passage trail and conservation initiative at the southern edge of Africa in the Cape mountains. These mountains form the core of the Cape Floristic Region, the smallest of the six recognised floral kingdoms of the world, an area of extraordinarily high diversity and endemism, and home to more than 9 000 plant species, the greatest non-tropical concentration of higher plant species in the world.

At its core the Rim of Africa initiative offers a hiking experience through a series of linked high mountain traverses, some involve easy path-hiking, while others are off-path and require confident mountain and hiking skills. The entire route is 52 days in duration and can be walked in a variety of ways.

The Rim of Africa mission is to help preserve and protect the natural beauty of these mountains and the important ecosystem functions they offer communities living along the route.

Rim of Africa is a mountain initiative with community, conservation and hiking at its heart.

Rim of Africa Map
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rim of africa image 3
Offas Dyke Logo

The Offa’s Dyke Path Friendship Trail – Iroquoia Club

In September 2013, a section of the Bruce Trail at between Waterdown’s Grindstone Creek and Burlington’s City View Park was twinned with the section of the Offa’s Dyke Path from the Welsh town of Knighton (Tref-y-clawdd in Welsh, a town on the dyke) to Ditchyeld Bridge on the Herefordshire/Powys County boundary. Below is a map of the Offa’s Dyke Path Friendship Trail, located in the Iroquoia Club section.

You’ll also find it on our Bruce Trail Reference Map 9

The Offa’s Dyke Path was opened in the summer of 1971, linking Sedbury Cliffs near Chepstow on the banks of the Severn estuary with the coastal town of Prestatyn on the shores of the Irish sea.

It is named after, and often follows, the spectacular Dyke which King Offa ordered to be constructed in the 8th century, probably to divide his Kingdom of Mercia from rival kingdoms in what is now Wales. 

In its 177 miles / 285 kilometres it passes through no less than eight different counties and crosses the border between England and Wales over 20 times. The Trail explores the tranquil Marches (as the border region is known) and passes through the Brecon Beacons National Park on the spectacular Hatterall Ridge. In addition it links no less than three Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty – the Wye Valley, the Shropshire Hills and the Clwydian Hills.

Click on the following links for Map 1, Map 2 and Map 3 showing the Friendship Trail route on the Offa’s Dyke Path

Offa’s Dyke Path FT Map 1 (.pdf, 586.9 KB)
Offa’s Dyke Path FT Map 2 (.pdf, 562.4 KB)
Offa’s Dyke Path FT Map 3 (.pdf, 544.8 KB)

Offas Dyke Map
Offas Dyke Image 1
Kythera Logo

Kythera Hiking Friendship Trail – Toronto Club

Kythera Image 1

In May 2017, a section of the Bruce Trail in the Toronto Club was twinned with Kythera Hiking in Greece. Below is a map of the  Kythera Hiking Friendship Trail located in the Toronto Club.

You’ll also find it on our Bruce Trail Reference Map 11 and Map 12.

Kythera lies between Greece and Crete, and is an island jewel in the Greek seas. A rough diamond spared from mass tourism, Kythera’s rugged terrain boasts immense ecological diversity. There is no better way to explore Kythera than by walking. Kythera Hiking is currently comprised of twelve hiking routes that guide visitors through age-old paths, scenic spots, waterfalls, ravines, medieval villages and secluded shores.

Kythera map
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Kythera Image 3
JeJu Olle logo

The Jeju Olle Friendship Trail – Caledon Hills Club

In September 2011, a section of the Bruce Trail in the Hockley Valley was twinned with Route 2 on the Jeju Olle. Below is a map of the Jeju Olle Friendship Trail on the Bruce Trail, located in the Caledon Hills Club, Map 18.

The Jeju Olle walking trail is located on the beautiful island of Jeju, South Korea. Jeju Island is located 130 kilometers south of the Korean Peninsula. It is a large volcanic island, almost sub-tropical in climate, with incredible scenery from the coastline through orange groves crisscrossed by distinctive stone walls and up to the peak of an inactive volcano. The Jeju Olle is the most popular walking trail in Korea, and provides over 200km of pathways, and plans are underway to extend the trail to encircle the entire island in the coming years.

JeJu Olle Map
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JeJu Olle image 3
Bibbulmun logo

Bibbulmun Track Friendship Trail – Dufferin Hi-Land

In May 2016, a section of the Bruce Trail in the Dufferin Hi-Land was twinned with the Bibbulmun Track in Australia. Below is a map of the Bibbulmun Track Friendship Trail on the Bruce Trail.

You’ll also find it on our Bruce Trail Reference Map 20.

The Bibbulmun Track opened its section of our Friendship Trail, from Balingup to Donnelly River Village, on November 1, 2015. If you are interested in more information or trip planning, please follow this link https://www.bibbulmuntrack.org.au/contact/ or https://www.bibbulmuntrack.org.au/walk-the-track/guided-tours/ or

https://www.bibbulmuntrack.org.au/walk-the-track/guided-tours/town-to-town-tours/

The Bibbulmun Track in Western Australia stretches 1000 kilometres from Kalamunda in the Perth Hills to the historic town of Albany on the south coast.

From karri forest to coastal heathlands the Track traverses some of the most beautiful and wild areas of the south west of Australia which is one of the world’s biodiversity hotspots.

Passing through nine rural towns and many popular scenic spots, walkers can enjoy day walks and the hospitality of local accommodation or embark on a six to eight week hike from end-to-end 

The Track is for walkers only with 49 campsites spaced a day’s walk apart. Each campsite has a three-sided timber shelter, dunny (toilet), rainwater tank, picnic tables and tent sites.

Bibbulmun map
Bibbulmun Image 5
Bibbulmun Image 1
Bibbulmun Image 2
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Bibbulmun Image 4
Transcarioca logo

Transcarioca Trail Friendship Trail – Blue Mountains Club

In October 2016, a section of the Bruce Trail in the Blue Mountains Club was twinned with the Transcarioca Trail in Brazil. Below is a map of the Transcarioca Trail Friendship Trail located in the Blue Mountains Club – Map 22

The 180 km Transcarioca Trail crosses Rio de Janeiro from Barra de Guaratiba to Morro da Urca, at the foot of the Sugar Loaf Mountain. The Transcarioca Trail strengthens the conservation and restoration of green corridors linking the main areas of Atlantic Forest in Rio de Janeiro. The trail offers hikers opportunities to enjoy little-known natural attractions and uncover wonderful views over Rio de Janeiro. Hundreds of volunteers believe and support the realization of this great project.

Transcarioca Map
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Transcarioca Image 3
Transcarioca Image 1
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Pacific Slope logo

The Pacific Slope (Sendero Pacifico) Friendship Trail – Beaver Valley Club

In June 2015, a section of the Bruce Trail in the Beaver Valley is twinned with a piece of the Pacific Slope Trail in Costa Rica. The Pacific Slope Trail (Sendero Pacífico) Friendship Trail follows the Bruce Trail between Hoggs Falls (km 63.3, Map 26) to the BTC’s parking lot at km 70.1 (Map 26) taking in a portion of 

the Beaver Valley’s beautiful Falling Waters landscape. Below is a map of the Pacific Slope Friendship Trail on the Bruce Trail.

The Pacific Slope Trail (Sendero Pacífico) section twinned with the Bruce Trail begins at San Luis in the famous Monteverde Cloud Forest conservation region, and the new Friendship Trail will lead into the Children’s Eternal Rain Forest by agreement with the Monteverde Conservation League.

The Pacific Slope Trail Network is a vision shared by an informal association of individuals, community groups, and some organizations who wish to link forests and rural communities along Costa Rica’s Pacific Slope via a freely accessible trail system.

Like the BTC, the Sendero Pacifico depends heavily on the participation and energy of many self-organized volunteers. The trail encompasses a network of trail systems, huts, conservation properties, ecological agriculture initiatives, alternative energy and wastewater treatment and water conservation projects.

Pacific slope map
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Lebanon mountain logo

The Lebanon Mountain Trail Friendship Trail – Sydenham Club

The Lebanon Mountain Trail Friendship Trail – Sydenham Club

In September 2012, a section of the Bruce Trail at the Bayview Escarpment Nature Reserve was twinned with section 5 of the Lebanon Mountain Trail. Below is a map of the Lebanon Mountain Trail Friendship Trail on the Bruce Trail, located in the Sydenham Club, Map 30.

The Lebanon Mountain Trail (LMT) is the first long-distance hiking trail in Lebanon. The LMT is 470 km (293 miles) in length and showcases the natural beauty and cultural wealth found among Lebanon’s mountains. It is home to 3 protected areas, 2 biosphere reserves and 1 World Heritage Site. The mandate of the LMT Association is to protect and promote the LMT for future generations.

Lebanon Mountain map
Lebanon Mountain image 3
Lebanon Mountain image 1
Lebanon Mountail Trail photo 2
Cotswold Way logo

The Cotswold Way Friendship Trail – Peninsula Club

In September 2012, a section of the Bruce Trail at the Lion’s Head Nature Reserve was twinned with a section of the Cotswold Way, located in England. Below is a map of the Friendship Trail on the Bruce Trail located in the Peninsula Club, Map 38

The Cotswold Way is a 102 mile National Trail in the west of England stretching between the beautiful market town of Chipping Campden in the north and the World Heritage Site of Bath in the south. This iconic walk leads you along the Cotswold Escarpment, giving you a taste of all that makes this area special. From stunning bluebell woods to open grassland with breathtaking views, through sleepy villages to thriving market towns, the Cotswold Way touches on unique variety of experience and earns its reputation of one of the world’s finest walks.

Click on the following link for the Cotswold Way Friendship Trail map in England. Cotswold Way Friendship Trail Map (.pdf, 256.2 KB)

Cotswold Way map
cotswold way trail photo
Cotswold Way image 4
Cotswold Way map

Bruce Trail Conservancy Events

Hike It! Love It! Keep It Clean! Litter Project

Hike It! Love It! Keep It Clean! Litter Project In response to an increase in litter along the…

4 min read

Annual Meeting 2022

Annual Meeting 2022 Online via Zoom October 15, 2022 from 10:00 AM until 12:00 PM The Bruce Trail Conservancy (BTC) Annual Meeting…

1 min read

End-to-End and Challenge Hikes

End-to-End and Challenge Hikes A convenient, fun and safe way to challenge yourself and hike large sections of…

4 min read

Recordings & Slides of Past Webinars:

APR. 14, 2022

Explore the amazing world of woodland fungi and the important role they play in Escarpment ecosystems. Learn about what to look for in the wonderful diversity of mushrooms you may encounter on your next Bruce Trail hike. The webinar includes mushroom anatomy, how to photograph mushrooms, mushroom families, examples from select families, and poisonous mushrooms.

Presented by: Louise Langlais
Louise has been interested in wild mushrooms since she was a young child but has become quite obsessed with the hobby for the past 20 years or so. It’s fun to learn new species and to be on the lookout for mushroom sightings while out and about in the great outdoors. Mushrooms are not only incredibly photogenic but are also a fascinating and important part of our environment!  In addition to hunting for mushrooms, she also leads hikes for the Bruce Trail Conservancy and snowshoe outings for the Five Winds Backcountry Ski Club.

Download the slides [pdf], or watch the recording:

JAN. 13, 2022

Join us as we take a virtual tour of the new and improved Bruce Trail App. On this tour we will look at the functions and features of the app – like creating a route, exploring BTC protected lands, and tracking a hike – and give tips and tricks to help you use the app to its full potential.

Presenter: Brooke Henry (BTC Communications Assistant)

Watch the recording:

Select one of options below to jump to that section of the video:

MAR. 11, 2021

What is a spring ephemeral? Why do certain plants flower before tree leaves emerge? Join our ecologists for answers to these questions, and more, on a virtual interpretive spring hike along the Bruce Trail. This webinar will focus on some of the various spring wildflowers that can be observed while hiking the Bruce Trail when life reemerges from its winter slumber.

Presented by: Brian Popelier (BTC Land Stewardship Coordinator and Ecologist)

Download the slides [pdf], or watch the recording:

DEC. 10, 2020

Join our conservation team as they discuss the many ways the Bruce Trail Conservancy works towards protecting the ecology of the Niagara Escarpment. This presentation will examine how the BTC acquires, protects and restores sensitive land along the Bruce Trail.

Presenters: Adam Brylowski (BTC Manager Conservation and Trail), Brian Popelier (BTC Land Stewardship Coordinator & Ecologist) & Mara McHaffie (BTC Landowner Stewardship Coordinator).

Download the webinar slides [pdf] or watch the recording:

JUNE 4, 2020

Meet 3 artists who have been inspired by the Niagara Escarpment on their explorations along the Bruce Trail: Suzanne Dyke (suzanne-dyke.wixsite.com/portfolio), Kristina Maus (www.kristinamaus.com), and Victoria Pearce (www.victoriapearce.ca) Take a stroll through a virtual gallery of their paintings and learn a bit more about their work, their process, and how the Bruce Trail has become their muse.

Download the webinar slides or watch the recording:

MAY 14, 2020

Sonya and Sean are long-time BTC members and End-to-Enders who’ve begun a #hike4birds along The Great Trail, formerly the Trans Canada Trail, promoting diversity in outdoor activities and striving to inspire youth to reconnect with nature through birding and Citizen Science. In this webinar, they share stories of their time on The Great Trail, and highlight how Citizen Science can be a way to bridge the divide between our digital landscapes and our natural ones.

Hosts: Sonya Richard and Sean Morton

Download the webinar slides [33MB] or watch the recording

APRIL 23, 2020

Find out what rare and at-risk species make their home on the Niagara Escarpment. From bugs, to birds, to botanical oddities, learn about these unique creatures and why protecting them is so important.

Hosts: Brian Popelier & Adam Brylowski (BTC Land Stewardship Coordinators & Ecologists)

Download the webinar slides [pdf], or watch the recording:

MAR. 10, 2022

Have you ever wondered what makes a species ‘invasive’? Curious about how the Bruce Trail Conservancy tackles this threat to Niagara Escarpment biodiversity? Join our resident ecologists to discuss the impact of invasive species on our local ecosystems, learn which species are considered the main offenders, and what strategies are being used to manage their spread.

Presented by: Mara McHaffie (BTC Ecologist) and Lyndsey Wilkerson (BTC Landowner Stewardship Coordinator)

Download the slides [pdf], or watch the recording:

NOV. 10, 2021

Land donations are of critical importance to the mission of the Bruce Trail Conservancy. Whether through lifetime gifts or bequests, gifts of land are integral to securing a conservation corridor along the Niagara Escarpment. As one of Ontario’s largest land trusts, the Bruce Trail Conservancy’s skilled team of staff and volunteers works as a conservation partner with landowners to help them achieve their philanthropic goals.

Key topics covered:

  • How the BTC team qualifies and secures land along the Niagara Escarpment
  • A discussion of how our team works with landowners to facilitate gifts of land, and the impact to our mission
  • Various options available when gifting land in lifetime or in estate
  • Charitable tax incentives which enable landowners to achieve their philanthropic and financial/estate planning goals

Presenters:

  • Antoin Diamond, Vice President of Land Acquisition, Bruce Trail Conservancy
  • Candice Jay, Vice President at CC&L Private Capital Ltd.
  • Vlad Solokhine, Certified Financial Planner at Lazar-Wealth Succession Strategies

Watch the recording:

FEB. 11, 2021

Your legacy is not just something you leave behind, but also something you live today. Your core beliefs, values, and life experiences are enduring assets to share with family and loved ones. This presentation will give you tips and tools to get started on creating the most important letter of your life, the Legacy Letter. This document can be shared in your lifetime or as an accompaniment to your will.

Presented by: Gloria Vidovich (BTC Planned Giving & Donor Relations Officer)

Download the slides [pdf], or watch the recording:

NOV. 12, 2020

Learn how to identify some of Ontario’s native trees and shrubs throughout the seasons. This webinar will provide you with an overview of techniques that will help you to expand your knowledge of species along the Bruce Trail. Join BTC ecologists to unravel the mystery of tree ID!

Presenters: Brian Popelier (BTC Land Stewardship Coordinator & Ecologist) & Adam Brylowski (BTC Manager Conservation and Trail).

Download the webinar slides [pdf] or watch the recording:

MAY 28, 2020

In this webinar we explore the fascinating geological history of the Niagara Escarpment. The rocks we see exposed along the Escarpment today were deposited in an ancient tropical sea that covered large parts of Ontario between 400 and 450 million years ago. The sea teemed with marine life and these ancient animals are now preserved as fossils within the limestones, dolostones and shales that accumulated on the sea floor. These ancient sedimentary rocks have been eroded over time as glaciers and rivers repeatedly scoured the landscape; the steep Escarpment face we see today continues to evolve as waterfalls cascade over its edge.

Presented by: Dr. Carolyn Eyles and Rebecca Lee, School of Geography & Earth Sciences, McMaster University.

Download the webinar slides [10 MB pdf] or watch the recording:

MAY 7, 2020

Get advice on planning an End-to-End hike of the Bruce Trail and tips on what to expect on your journey. If “hike the whole Bruce Trail” is on your bucket list, either as a thru-hike or in stages over time, this is the session to watch.

Host: Ruth Moffatt (Bruce Trail End-to-Ender, BTC Member, Volunteer, Donor & Avid Hiker)

Download the webinar slides [8MB pdf] or watch the recording:

APRIL 16, 2020

Learn how you can improve biodiversity and wildlife habitat in your own backyard, through the protection and planting of native plants and the identification and management of invasives.

Hosts: Lyndsey Wilkerson (BTC Landowner Stewardship Coordinator) & Brian Popelier (BTC Land Stewardship Coordinator & Ecologist)

Download the webinar slides [pdf], or watch the recording:

Gchi-Bimadinaa / The Great Cliff That Runs Along

Watch the Bruce Trail Conservancy’s latest volunteer education webinar led by Plenty Canada Senior Advisor Tim Johnson and Executive Director Larry McDermott, exploring Indigenous conservation philosophies and practices, the establishment of Indigenous legacy spaces along and near the Bruce Trail in Niagara, and the partnership between Plenty Canada and the BTC.

FEB. 10, 2022

Your Will is a powerful expression of your legacy, and yet the majority of Canadians don’t have one in place. The new year may be the perfect time to review existing estate plans, or begin a new one.

Join us for this final presentation of our three-part planned giving series on creating your will.

Key topics covered:

  • Importance of having a Will and how to get started
  • Benefits of a holistic approach (gifts outside of the Will, coordinating advisors)
  • Supporting family, and the charities you love (how you can do both)
  • When an online Will makes sense

Presenters:

  • Arin Klug, Co-Founder & Chief Operating Officer at Epilogue Wills
  • Candice Jay, Vice President at CC&L Private Capital Ltd.
  • Vlad Solokhine, Certified Financial Planner at Lazar-Wealth Succession Strategies

Watch the recording:

OCT. 7, 2021

In this webinar, Candice Jay and Vlad Solokhine explore various ways that charitable giving can compliment your personal financial planning and philanthropic goals. You will learn about techniques to enhance your charitable gifts, get involved with your favourite charities on a new level, and save on taxes.

Key topics covered:

  • Benefits and ease of gifting appreciated securities
  • The power of life insurance as a philanthropic tool
  • Gifts through registered accounts (RRSP, RRIF etc.)

Presenters:
Candice Jay, Vice President at CC&L Private Capital Ltd.
Vlad Solokhine, Certified Financial Planner at Lazar-Wealth Succession Strategies

Candice and Vlad are well known among Ontario environmental charities for their donor education webinars and guidance on charitable gifts.

Read more about Candice and Vlad in their biographies here.  

Watch the recording:

JAN. 14, 2021

Enjoy a virtual travel experience by discovering three of the Bruce Trail Conservancy’s beautiful international friendship trails – Kythera Trails, Lebanon Mountain Trail, and Cotswold Way – with presenters from each of these trail organizations.

Kythera Trails (www.kytheratrails.gr)
Presenter: Rigas Zafeiriou, Local Project Manager, Kythera Trails
Download Kythera Trails presentation slides [pdf]. Presentation starts at 0:27 in recording.

Cotswold Way (www.nationaltrail.co.ukwww.cotswoldsaonb.org.uk)
Rebecca Jones, Cotswold Trails, Access and Volunteers Lead
Download Cotswold Way presentation slides [pdf].  Presentation starts at 14:47 in recording

Lebanon Mountain Trail (www.lebanontrail.org)
Maya Karkour, President, Lebanon Mountain Trail Association
Download Lebanon Mountain Trail presentation slides [pdf]. Presentation starts at 29:45 in recording

Question & Answer Period for all 3 presentations starts at 50:27 in recording.

JUNE 11, 2020

Join us for a virtual walk to learn about some of the native flora found along the Bruce Trail and how to identify it. This webinar focusses on common growing season ID features such as leaves, flowers and fruit as well as some dormant characteristics such as buds, branching and bark. We also explore some common “look-alike” plants and how to tell them apart.

Presenters: Brian Popelier & Adam Brylowski (BTC Land Stewardship Coordinators & Ecologists).

Download the webinar slides [pdf] or watch the recording:

MAY 21, 2020

Join Amanda for a live demo of eBird and learn how our own bird observations can contribute to scientific understanding of Important Biodiversity Areas (IBAs). She’ll share insights from her work at Birds Canada and reveal how we can each start our own life list of birds.

For more great info, subscribe to Bird Canada’s Ontario IBA Newsletter.

Host: Amanda Bichel (Ontario Important Bird and Biodiversity Area Coordinator, Birds Canada)

Download webinar slides [4MB pdf] or watch the recording:

APRIL 30, 2020

Discover Costa Rica’s Sendero Pacifico – one of the BTC’s 9 international Friendship Trails – and learn how you can be part of a future volunteer vacation or customized tour to this beautiful trail.

Hosts: Nat Scrimshaw (Chair, World Trails Network-Americas) & Ros Rossetti (Beaver Valley Bruce Trail Club Past President)

Download the webinar slides [14MB pdf] or watch the recording:

Watch the Bruce Trail Conservancy’s volunteer education webinar led by Ashoo Anand of Credit Valley Conservation, discussing diversity and inclusion within conservation and outdoor spaces and removing barriers to making outdoor spaces inclusive to all:

Ways To Get Involved

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