HistoryIn 1960 the idea of a public footpath spanning the entire Niagara Escarpment was born. Never before in Canadian history had a trail of this scope been realized.   Raymond Lowes articulated this vision of a footpath to friend Robert Bateman at a meeting of the Federation of Ontario Naturalists. 

The first meeting of the Bruce Trail Committee was in 1960. The four members attending: Norman Pearson, Ray Lowes, Dr. Robert MacLaren and Philip Gosling, each became instrumental in building the Bruce Trail.

Gaining access to the Niagara Escarpment was the critical first step in building the Bruce Trail.  From 1960 to today, Escarpment landowners have been key to the existence of the Bruce Trail.  Understanding that building relationships was essential, then Trail Director Philip Gosling, visited major towns along the proposed trail route to solicit help. Literately going door-to-door, Philip Gosling and his team of volunteers discussed their vision of a trail along the Niagara Escarpment with landowners. Happily, they were greeted with support all along the way.   Regional Clubs were established by 1963.  Each Club was responsible for organization, landowner approvals, construction and maintenance.

In Tobermory, 1967- Canada's Centennial Year - the cairn at the northern terminus of the Bruce Trail was unveiled. Seven years of determination, support, vision and hard work were realized when the Bruce Trail was officially opened.